Sarah Darling: Winter Wonderland

Just as Shane Richie puts out a country album, genuine country music singer Darling puts out a Christmas album. They’re all well-known tunes done well, so the only question is how you feel about a set of slow but intimate covers delivered by Darling’s soft and sweet vocals. The album opens with an ok cover […]

Kim Churchill: Weight_Falls

We listen to a lot of music. A fair bit gets played again, some goes on the Review Corner iPod and a select few are placed in the genre “genius”, the albums we really like and play over. Kim Churchill’s breakout Silence/Win is in there, because it’s a really nice album that we like listening […]

Steven Isserlis: The Cello in Wartime

After reporting on the news from a century ago every week since war was declared in 1914, we’re seeing the end of the war approaching (if only people in 1917 had been so lucky), and expecting a deluge of war-related products, as the centenary of the end approaches. This one is very good. Given the […]

Courtney Marie Andrews: On My Page

  There’s a couple of albums that have stayed on the Review Corner iPod for ages (Keri Noble’s 2004 album Fearless is the longest survivor); at heart country, they are also bluesy ballads sung by women with crystal clear voices. They don’t advance any genres or break new ground. They’re just strong albums of nice […]

Colin Newcombe: 13 Fragments

Newcombe is a local author who has produced a book that should be handed out to anyone thinking of descriptive writing and self-publishing. So with some joy we can say first what it isn’t: it’s not badly proofed, badly written or short of ideas, and Newcombe has clearly lavished a lot of attention on both […]

Norman Ohler: Blitzed

This accessible history book is a good present for anyone who likes modern history but doesn’t want a heavy read. Ohler is a novelist and the book reads like a novel, but he’s done his research; Ian Kershaw, a world-leading authority on Hitler and Nazi Germany, has described it as “a serious piece of scholarship”. […]

Camille: Oui

An album we’ve spent so long listening to, we’ve written 10 reviews mentally; the fact that’s proving so hard to write anything down is itself a review, and perhaps not a terribly good one. It’s not a bad album by any means. It was recorded over a year in La Chartreuse, a 14th century monastery-turned-artist’s […]

Tom Millar Quartet: Unnatural Events

The Tom Millar Quartet is modern, fast and busy. They’re low on melody but there’s lots going on, and it’s more about the overall vibe, which is laid back. Millar said in an interview of his debut album as a leader that he “went on a musical journey”, taking in Brazilian and world music, as […]

Johann Schelle: Christmas Cantatasj

This programme of Classic FM-style sacred music is ideal for people who want some reverential music during the festive period, but don’t want massed choirs yelling “Gloria!” at the top of their lungs while they’re peeling the spuds (the people, not the choirs). Schelle (1648-1701) was the music director at the Church of St Thomas […]

The Wedding Present: George Best

Thirty-year-old albums are always hard to appraise: everyone wot wants them has got ‘em, and no-one else really cares. While George Best is an indie classic, it’s not the Weddos’ best. (As we think singer David Gedge lives locally we’d better say all their albums are great, obviously). We quite liked the Wedding Present. We […]