Cliff Richard: 75 At 75

review cliff x1 cong

We were going to say that Cliff’s best career move would have been to choke on an olive in about 1964, then he’d be remembered as that cool rock ‘n’ roll singer who never fulfilled his potential (for lachrymose Christmas songs). But listening to CD1 on this collection, he was never cool in the first place, so we binned that idea as a theme.
What can you say about Sir Cliff? You probably know many of the tunes on here, and you’ll either hate most of them or love him to bits. If you hate him, you’re not going to buy this and if you love him, you’ve already bought it.
Still: even if you hate him, it’s just under a tenner for 75 songs and it’s a triple CD. Under a tenner, nice fat box — it’s an ideal Christmas present.
The 75 songs is impressive enough but it’s only just half of his 123 hit singles. Hit every decade and all that. The collection mostly features Cliff’s top 10 hits, though it also includes songs like Miss You Nights that were lesser hits.
We were surprised how cheesy his rock n roll hits really were — though some are not bad at all — and how many Christmas hits there are on CD3.
Sir Cliff obviously doesn’t write his own songs — the only one he gets a credit for is Bachelor Boy (obviously a believer in the “write what you know” school of thought) so we were impressed by how many the backing band wrote: Bruce Welch and Hank Marvin wrote or co-wrote around 10 songs each on here. Alan Tarney crops up a few times — he wrote We Don’t Talk Any More — and there’s one new song, Golden, written by Chris Eaton, who wrote Saviour’s Day.

About jerobear

Weekly newspaper editor in Cheshire, England. I blog my editorials and the CDs I write about. I play drums, drink coffee, play music, meditate. I hate filling in forms.

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