Category: Indie

  • Hinds: Leave Me Alone

    This all-girl band from Madrid are going to be all over the shop this year, as youngsters discover how exciting music can be. Older fans will have heard it all before, The Troggs Wild Thing onwards. It’s got a definite ramshackle charm, albeit one that fades a little as the album plays through. A bit…

  • Fictonian: (Desire Lines)

    We often wander the webbershpere, checking out other reviews, and we’ve never read such twaddle as was being written about this. We must have read half a dozen meandering reviews by people with nothing to say. It’s possibly the audience he’s aiming at though: his Press release talks about spending time in a Fictonian reality…

  • Thus Owls: Black Matter

      We often wondered about why experimental / arty band Liars kept going but now we know — it was to inspire others with their creepy (and often unlistenable) electronic experimentation. Black Owls take the scary experimentation of Liars and make it more palatable, though this is still unsettling music in places. Thus Owls are…

  • Johnny Marr: Adrenalin Baby Live

    Live albums can be a bit hit and miss: usually the studio versions are better (though not always — Neil Young live and in the studio is equally interesting). In this case, Marr live is better than in the studio, at least for his solo work. His debut solo album (The Messenger) was a little…

  • Eternal Summers: Gold And Stone

      We don’t like being negative about music — to write even a half-way decent tune is very hard — but this pop indie album did nothing more than fill us with apathy. There’s nothing to set it apart from any other indie album from a band with jangly guitars and a female vocalist. We’re…

  • Chorusgirl: Chorusgirl

    The Press release calls this band a “noise pop” quartet, that description being the one of choice when you can’t think of anything else to say. As opposed to the “silent pop” bands, maybe. We played this through several times before it caught; if you don’t pay attention it’s easy to dismiss, but it’s got…

  • Postcards From Jeff: Modern Language

    We quite liked Postcards From Jeff’s EP last year; we thought they were American but now discover they’re from Manchester (so know “quite liked” means “really liked”). This full-length collection of tunes sees us part happy and part a little disappointed: they create dreamy indie rock/pop and do it well but they don’t wander much…

  • Richard Hawley: Hollow Meadows

    Hawley treads a thin line between sublime songs that are works of art – as good as any music you will hear, anywhere – and more pedestrian tracks that are just ok. Although his earlier solo albums were mostly gentle, anachronistic crooners the last was more psychedelic and this new one is a mix between…

  • Tom Robinson: Only the Now

    We suspect people who remember Tom Robinson back in the day will like this, while younger listeners will find it harder to digest. While the Tom Robinson Band did have some good tunes, the music was often second place to the lyrics, which were never less than entertaining. Songs were either just songs about nothing…

  • John Dhali: EP

    Dhali is from Congleton and this is a most impressive EP, with no sign of that “local artist, budget production” thing going on. The sleeve is nice and the music even better. Dhali has a folky troubadour style, somewhere between Willy Mason and Jake Bugg, with a splash of Jeff Buckley on the vocals. Opener…